Suggestions for Home
  The language of reading and books is very different from the language of talking. When we talk we use different vocabulary, different syntax, gestures and tone of voice to convey thoughts and ideas. Reading uses only words and sometimes pictures to convey a thought. The structure of written language is generally more formal and has a different rhythm than spoken language. For children learning to read it is important to ensure a positive experience. Repetition and familiarity in activities create comfortable and fun opportunities as they build confidence and skill.

  For children learning to read it is improtant to ensure a positive experience. Repetition and familiarity in activities create comfortable and fun opportunities as they build confidence and skill.

  Whether a child is just beginning to read, is able to read at a low level and is frustrated with any reading/writing task or is having trouble understanding what is read, using everyday activities that involve written language can make reading and writing fun and interactive:
    reading signs and symbols while driving
    recognizing logos and words at the grocery store
    reading and writing letters and cards
    reading and composing funny poems
    creating lists
    following a recipe
    game or toy instructions

  Pictures and symbols are a part of the written communication experience. It may be helpful to include pictures and symbols as needed.

  A Speech-Language Pathologist or other professional who specializes in reading disorders can help you identify the skills needed to improve your child's success, know what tasks and activities a child ready to work on, find ways to deal with frustration, identify ways to prompt and cue your child and provide appropriate materials that provide opportunities for your child to practice.